I See You at the Summit

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity”

John Muir

Perhaps I am one of those tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilised people that I think mountains sometimes felt like home.

This year I made few trips to Kubah National Park. It is about 40 minutes drive from Kuching.

I took the waterfall trail earlier this year then I climbed till I reach the submit on Labour’s Day.

The last time I went there was a couple months ago with my The Borneo Post SEEDS colleague Sendou.

For those who are physically unfit, the trails could be difficult.

But those who who extremely fit, Kubah’s summit Mount Serapi is a piece of cake.

I enjoy my every trip there and I highly recommend everyone, not just tourists but especially Sarawakians to pay this park a visit.

Here is a brief introduction about Kubah National Park according to Sarawak Forestry Department’s official website:

“Almost every visitor to Kuching has seen Kubah National Park, whether they realise it or not. This massive sandstone ridge with its three mountain peaks – the 911m high Gunung Serapi and the slightly smaller Gunung Selang and Gunung Sendok – is clearly visible from the Kuching Waterfront. Situated only 22 kilometres from Kuching, Kubah is not only the most visible but also one of the most accessible of Sarawak’s National Parks.

Kubah was established in 1989 because of its exceptionally rich plant life, and only opened to the public in 1995. The Park covers an area of 2,230 hectares, and comprises the heavily forested slopes and ridges of the Serapi range. At heights of between 150-450 metres, Kubah’s soft sandstone is punctuated with bands of hardened limestone which have created a number of beautiful waterfalls.

Kubah’s most famous feature is its palms. Almost a hundred different palm species can be found in an area of just over 22 sq km, making Kubah probably the richest palm habitat for its size anywhere in the world. But Kubah’s palms are not only abundant – they are also historically and ecologically important. Many of Kubah’s palms were first described by the great Italian botanist Odoardo Beccari (1843-1920), who spent 3 years in Sarawak from 1865 to 1868, and recorded his findings and experiences in a remarkable book, Wanderings in the Great Forests of Borneo.

As well as its palms, Kubah has many other striking attractions; its spectacular primary rainforest, its rich selection of orchids and ferns, and its crystal clear jungle streams, waterfalls and bathing areas, to name just a few. The rainforest scenery has even caught the attention of Hollywood; in 1987 Gunung Serapi was the principal film location for Farewell to the King starring Nick Nolte – as you approach the entrance to the park HQ you will see the film set to the right. The Sleeping Dictionary, starring Jessica Alba, was shot in the nearby forest foothills adjacent to the park, which provided a stunning backdrop for the film.

The forest at Kubah is mixed dipterocarp, with small areas of scrub forest and isolated patches of kerangas. This rich forest, the park’s proximity to the coastline and its general terrain all ensure that Kubah is home to a variety of wildlife, including bearded pigs, 50-plus bird species (including argus pheasants and black hornbills), sambar deer, mouse deer, civets, porcupines, squirrels and numerous species of amphibians and reptiles.”

Check my photos out, peeps!

20150511_131123 20150511_131158 20150511_131636 20150511_131659 20150511_132019 20150511_132022 20150511_132100

I see you at the summit, love

I see you at the summit, love

I see you when we both tired

I see you when our shirts stuck to our sweaty backs

I see you when we raise our arms we could touch the sky

I see you when our legs almost give on up us

I see you when we feel ashamed of ourselves because

Like our legs, we too almost give up

I see you when we are both in awe

In awe with what God gave us in view

In awe with what God gave us in each other

So

I see you at the summit, love

~p.h , 14/07/2015

My Heart Sank Every Time We Never Said Goodbye

There are two things I disagree with Sir Elton John; first is same-sex marriage, second is when he said sorry is the hardest word. I bet he never had to say goodbye.

My heart sank every single freaking time when we say goodbye. It’s funny because we talked for hours on the phone every night when we are apart.

It sank when he looked at me and said, “I love you”.

It sank when he kissed my cheek after he said, “I love you”.

It sank when he did not say goodbye, but ‘I’ll see you again”.

It sank when it felt like we don’t  need to say goodbye as if,

as if,

as if,

We will grow old together,

as if,

as if,

Death will never separate us.

My heart sank every time when we never said goodbye.